Plant Sale for the Birds

Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) can become dominant plants in the landscape. They are especially harmful in the forest understory where they shade out native plants and result in a monoculture. They do not support the insects that birds need for their growing chicks.

Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) are especially harmful in the forest understory where they shade out native plants and result in a monoculture. They do not support the insects that birds need for their growing chicks. (hort.uconn.edu/plants)

Many species of non-native invasive plants have been banned for sale in Connecticut and across the country. But those that still grow in our gardens and along highways continue to impact our native habitats by spreading into forests, fields, and wetlands.  Often, it is the birds that help them spread by eating their fruits and distributing their seeds. These include Oriental bittersweet, Japanese honeysuckle, autumn olive, and multiflora rose. And some invasive plants, such as Japanese barberry, winged euonymus, and European privet are still legally sold in our state, although sales are being phased out. (Get invasive plant factsheets.)

In an effort to discourage the continued planting and spread of invasive garden species, we are offering for sale several species of native trees, shrubs, and vines that will provide important food for our favorite birds, while protecting the diversity of local habitats from monocultures of invasive plants.

The native trees, shrubs, and vines are supplied by a local grower. Working with our local grower makes it possible for us to sell these plants are very reasonable prices.

Trumpet honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens), a vine that is attractive to Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, is a native alternative to Japanese honeysuckle.

Trumpet honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens), a vine that is attractive to Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, is a native alternative to Japanese honeysuckle.(hort.uconn.edu/plants)

When choosing plants for your yard, we hope you will also consider replacing any invasive plant species you may have with wildlife-friendly native plants.

The 2017 plant sale has concluded. Check back in 2018 for our next selection of native plants.

Questions: Contact Cindi at cindi@menunkatuck.org